Plimmerton

(AKA Plimi) Wellington, New Zealand

Av. Rating in 2685 Sessions

Plimmerton:

Information

Information about Plimmerton, what's done there and who does it

Activities done here

Windsurfing - Waves, Bump n Jump, Racing, Just cruising, Freestyle, Grovel/Swim, , Speed
Stand Up Paddle Boarding - Just cruising, Long distance, Surfing, Waves
Surfing - short board
Kite Surfing - freeride, waves
Snorkelling
Sports Photography
Photography
Canoeing - Just Cruising

General Information

How do I get there.
Take the west coast highway north pass Porirua. Watch for the Plimmerton turn off. Spot is located at the railway crossing when entering Plimmerton. Takes about 30 minutes from central Wellington.

What should I look out for.
Some rigging and parking is right by the railway line, and you may end up carrying gear across the road. Look out for trains and cars. Avoid parking in private drive ways. The have been a cople of car break-ins in the past. To avoid this the best thing to do is not leave fancy looking stuff or bags in full view.

All in all Plimi is a pretty safe place to sail with plenty of land masses around if you get in trouble. if the worst does happen and you break something or the wind dies, the main thing to remember when swimming back in is don't panic.

The outgoing tide will take to slightly nth towards the fire station on the rock point (not out to sea). And the incoming tide will pull you towards the Shell Station andMcDee's. Both are a sort walk back to the launch spot.

If you land on the other side, then derig and pack your gear together, walk along the beach to the harbor channel and its a 150-200m paddle across.

Thing to remember:

Just keep swimming.
Never leave your gear and  try swim it alone.
Don't give up, you'll always hit land somewhere.

edited by kate 16.05.09


Windsurfing

Whats it like.
Wellingtons northerly wind wavespot. Heaps of parking, changing rooms, grass rigging and a nice sandy beach. No shorebreak to speak of. Waves form on a sandbar in the middle of the bay. This is the place for learning to wavesail or to get the most air you have ever experienced. Slow wave, starbord tack wavesailing. Mostly cross-onshore, average headhigh wave.

What are the best conditions.
Best 1 to 2 hours after high tide. Most of the time the tides are extremely important, it might be flat on an incoming tide, but head high waves a couple of hours later! But if there is a good ground swell then it can work on all tides.

Most common and required wind direction is N to NW, which will produce above mentioned conditions. The more N it goes the gustier it gets. Some like this, as the waverides get more sideshore, others hate it. A couple of times a year with the support of a big groundswell coming in from the Tasman Sea, waves can get logo high + on the bar and produce some great wavesailing as long as the wind does not go too far to the west.

Who does it suit.
Plimmerton is most used by experienced wave sailors, tough beginner and intermediate wavesailors love the spot, as there is extremely easy access, you never will get drilled on rocks, and its a great place for shredding it up. Plimmerton is also rated by slalom sailors, in any southerly as well as light northerly winds. Great course racing on "calm" days out to Mana Island.

edited by kate 04.06.09

Latest Sessions

June
12
2016
Sessions logged
1
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May
12
2016
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1
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January
8
2016
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1
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December
13
2015
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1
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October
18
2015
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1
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October
17
2015
Sessions logged
1
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